About this Episode

Does This Make FOSS Better or Worse | Ask Noah Show 85

Does the "Commons Clause" help the commons? The Commons Clause was announced recently along with several projects moving portions of their code base under it. It's an additional restriction intended to be applied to existing open source licenses with the effect of preventing the work from being sold. We play devils advocate and tell you why this might not be such a bad thing. As always your calls go to the front of the line, and we give you the details on how you can win free stuff in the Telegram group!

-- The Cliff Notes --

For links to the articles and material referenced in this week's episode check out this week's page from o our podcast dashboard!

This Episode's Podcast Dashboard

Phone Systems for Ask Noah provided by Voxtelesys

-- Stay In Touch --

Find all the resources for this show on the Ask Noah Dashboard

Ask Noah Dashboard

Need more help than a radio show can offer? Altispeed provides commercial IT services and they’re excited to offer you a great deal for listening to the Ask Noah Show. Call today and ask about the discount for listeners of the Ask Noah Show!

Altispeed Technologies

Contact Noah

asknoah [at] jupiterbroadcasting.com

-- Twitter --

Episode Links

  • mjg59 | The Commons Clause doesn't help the commons
  • Commons Clause License
  • Commons Clause stops open-source abuse | TechCrunch
  • Elementary OS First Impressions: A Simple, Beautiful Doorway To Linux — As part of my journey into the expansive and exciting world of Linux desktops, I’ve been engaging in a behavior known as “distro hopping.” I’m sure many Linux users have their personal reasons for doing this, but for me it’s fueled in equal parts by curiosity and knowledge hunting. So recently, I (temporarily) left the comfortable embrace of Ubuntu to discover the different philosophies and approaches developers have to designing a Linux OS. One of my first stops was Elementary OS 0.4.1. Loki.
  • Life is Strange released for Linux & SteamOS, some thoughts and a port report included | GamingOnLinux — Life is Strange is a story rich game I’ve been wanting to play ever since I first saw it and now, thanks to Feral Interactive, we all have that chance. Life is Strange is officially available on Linux & SteamOS. Hella yeah! Episode one has now been made free, so if you want to support feral you will need buy additional episodes. It has five episodes in total.
  • linux - How do you run a script on login in *nix? - Stack Overflow — When Bash starts, it executes the commands in a variety of different scripts. When Bash is invoked as an interactive login shell, it first reads and executes commands from the file /etc/profile, if that file exists. After reading that file, it looks for ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login, and ~/.profile, in that order, and reads and executes commands from the first one that exists and is readable. When a login shell exits, Bash reads and executes commands from the file ~/.bash_logout, if it exists. When an interactive shell that is not a login shell is started, Bash reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc, if that file exists. This may be inhibited by using the --norc option. The --rcfile file option will force Bash to read and execute commands from file instead of ~/.bashrc.
  • Live Feed of Ubnt Cams — New Code As some of you may or may not know, I own and operate a small business. I installed a Unifi Video Camera System for a client with two RPI RTSP Screens. The person overseeing the project took interest in the RPI Screens and ended up rewriting practically all the code. Huge Thank You to AnonymousDog. New Code Below, Enjoy!